Festival 2018

Classic Album Sundays presents: Classical Uncovered

Monday 3 December, 7.30–9.15pm (2018)

Chats Palace

Hear a panel discussion with Richard Reed Parry followed by an uninterrupted vinyl playback of Tomita's Snowflakes are Dancing

PRICE: £10–£12

Online booking for this event has now closed. Tickets will be available to purchase on the door.

Tomita Snowflakes are Dancing

Following last year’s sell-out success, Classic Album Sundays returns to the Spitalfields Music Festival, with a classical-meets-electronic twist. As part of a new series Classical Uncovered, Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy will feature non-classical artists discussing their favourite classical recording and how it has influence their work, before an uninterrupted vinyl playback of the full album on Classic Album Sundays’ audiophile hi-fi.

In the spotlight this year is multi-instrumentalist, producer and composer Richard Reed Parry, best known as a member of Grammy Award-winning band Arcade Fire. His chosen album is Snowflakes are Dancing by Japanese musician Isao Tomita. The album features arrangements of Debussy’s tone paintings, including Clair de Lune and The Girl with the Flaxen Hairperformed on a Moog synthesizer and a mellotron, bringing the colours of Debussy’s music into a new context.

Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy in conversation with Richard Reed Parry and André de Ridder

Bar and doors open from 7pm

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Venue information

Chats Palace

Chats Palace
42-44 Brooksby's Walk
London
E9 6DF
United Kingdom

Get directions

Underground & Overground

Homerton Overground (6 mins)
Hackney Central Station 
(14 mins)
Hackney Wick Overground (25 mins)
Walking times are given in brackets.

Buses

To plan your quickest route by bus, use TFL’s journey planner.

Chats Palace is an inter-generational arts centre working to bring together the community of Hackney through the arts. Founded in the 1976, Chats Palace is an impressive cultural landmark. In its conception, Chats Palace brought something different to the growing number of arts centres due to its focus on the working-class community and, as such, engages large numbers of residents in a range of artistic programmes.

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